1948 Hudson Commodore Coupe.

February 2, 2013

16 comments

16 comments:

jim said...

Super dee duper!

Howard said...

Seriously, how was it humanly possible to make a car this beautiful? simply astonishing. Also, I love the new blog header photo!

Anonymous said...

Who brings a penguin to a dog wash?

Pretty dang cool ride.

joey said...

500 cars less than 2010 last year, posting cars from previous years and no Best Of list and wonky pictures sizes like the recent Charger shots.

Old Parked Cars is not what it used to be but I still come here everyday.

Ben Piff said...

Joey, Tony and I are enjoying the blog more than ever despite growing responsibilities at home and work. When we started the blog, for example, I didn't have a job or a child. Tony now has two kids and two demanding jobs.

We're experimenting with the layout, and we're also working on best ofs, but they both will take a lot of time. The Charger got a lot of fun comments, can you choose to focus on the positives? This is all intended to be fun. If you'd like to give feedback or ask questions, can you email directly?

Thanks.

SeattleO said...

The blog is as good as this car. Which is totally awesome. Love that it's in driver condition; a nice contrast to most of these. Great grill and love the two tone. The rear end is just fantastic. Although it's obviously from the 40s or early 50s, it still looks ahead of its time. Great find.

Maciej Rosłoniec said...

I have to say that it's so amazingly beuautiful car. No, wait. Not a car. I think it's something more.

Great bed, and, as someone mentioned, also looks like a kind of penguin. That big grill and lots of chrom and delicate body line covering rear wheels. Perfect!

Tony Piff said...

hahaha, 2010 was a ridiculous year. i remember during those first few months we were both unemployed and posting like seven cars a day.

hopefully quality will make up for quantity as we move into the future.

thanks for your comments, joey. we've been wanting to freshen up the layout somehow, so i've just been tweaking it every couple of days and seeing how it looks on different machines, figuring out what feels right. we'll settle into a groove shortly.

and i'm glad to hear you noticed the lack of a best-of-2012 post. we'll get around to that, too, when we have the time.

we've also been focusing some energy on the opc coffee table book, which exists only in our heads at the moment. we'll be sure to keep you guys posted on that as soon as the project has real traction.

tremendous hudson and fantastic images. i've photographed this car numerous times at night with terrible results and was waiting to catch it with decent light. success, benny!

SeattleO said...

Book sounds great, but wouldn't you have to get permission from the owners, and things like that?

great white tiburon said...

I always loved this body. the rear wheels were so well hidden that it looked as if the rear was floating in dark areas. Hudson was a fantastic car make and the brand name was just cool. as far as the new blog layout goes, it works. that's all that matters imo. glad to hear you guys might put out a book. If you do, I will be one of your customers . the blog is great, keep up the good work.

Justin said...

SeattleO summed it up perfectly. "The blog is as good as this car. Which is totally awesome."
And yep, great to see it in driver condition, not some overshined and overchromed show-car.

Dave said...

First of all, I'd like to say this is my favorite blog of all time. Second, as creative directors, you guys are allowed to show/shoot/post whatever pleases you. I'd rather not see posts that mimic 'requests'. You guys do a great job. I've viewed this blog for a few years now and I've done my best to comment on the 'best of' (in my opinion). The Hudson was the finest American car to be slayed by the merger. From literally ruling Nascar and Grand National racing in the early '50s to becoming a bloated, gaudy caricature of itself and its untimely demise in 1957, the Hudson (like the Studebaker) was truly a car ahead of its time. Low-slung unibody construction and one of the best performance inline 6-cylinder engines couldn't save the Hudson from George Romney (Mitt's dad). In the American Motors merger of 1954, 2 of the 3 senior executives were from Nash, so the writing on the wall for Hudson was not good. The Jet was a terrific car that wasn't marketed properly and priced too high to compete with Ford and Chevy. In 1955, Hudson was a rebadged Nash. Romney's final solution was to introduce the Rambler using (of course) Nash tooling. Look at the Hudsons from '55, '56, and '57- you'll see these cars have nothing in common with these beauties from the '40s.

clifton.ra said...

"...wasn't marketed properly and priced too high to compete..."

WW II probably kept a few independents alive. The war and materials rationing wore out cars and the market was hungry for any new cars. By the early '50s the sales runs were sated. The big 3 had market share and the profits to retool and run 3 year design cycles including the yearly facelifts. The independents did what they could, and the mergers began.

Anonymous said...

Love this blog and this Hudson I've seen floating around St. Johns on and off for the last few years. I like everything you guys post, so know many of us are with you in spirit and appreciate all you guys do. I'd like to see Homing Missle get updated! Thanks Ben and Tony for all you do here! Frank

captaingizmo54 said...

My Granddad had one of these when I was very young. His was a '52 Hornet as I recall. He drove only Hudsons until they quit building them in '57, then he switched to
GM. Every time I see one of these I think of Granddad.

Anonymous said...

Herschel Biggs's car in L.A. Noire