1950 Nash Airflyte Statesman.

September 25, 2011

9 comments




9 comments:

tony said...

wow, what an utterly appealing car 1950 car. back seat looks utterly cavernous, i wonder what it's really like.

perfect two-tone. looks like a challenging shoot. very well exposed.

The Professor said...

"Bathtub" tag?

autofrei said...

man does that Nash have presence - it looks like it takes up that whole block, almost.

kenosha62 said...

First American car to offer seat belts!
Ya gotta love the Airflytes

Justin said...

Wow.....absolutely gorgeous.

Anonymous said...

Reminds me of the tin cars I had as a kid for my Lionel train set. The passengers were painted on the tin windows in fake 3D. Man, I'm getting old!

Dave said...

Can you imagine living in 1950 and thinking this is the car of the future? Albeit, it had a bulletproof inline six that will still start and run in 2050, and more room inside than most new trucks. The flowing aerodynamic lines of dirigible on steroids and the handling of a barge.

Anonymous said...

The Nash Golden Airflyte line of big cars introduced in 1952 had front seats that reclined flat and coupled with the backseat turned the interior into a large bed. Nash dealers offered optional air mattresses and window screens.

clifton.ra said...

"... in 1950 and thinking this is the car of the future?..."

The Chrysler Air-Flow was 15 years prior, and the '49 Ford had step-down design with integral fenders. Studebaker was the first post-war car to have step-down. But, the car of the future was the Cadillac, with tail-fins and an overhead valve V-8! It needed to look like a rocket!
Nash was struggling like all the independents and any new automobile flew off of the dealer's lot. War rationing had resulted in worn out cars. This situation kept the independents going for several more years. Nash was not a trend-setter or style leader.